Death and How to Plan for the Inevitable

By Megan Brinsfield, CFA, CFP

Whether contemplating your own mortality or supporting a loved one going through illness, death is typically not embraced in the American culture as a dinner table topic. Megan Brinsfield and Sean Gates talk through some of the financial aspects of end-of-life planning. (See Megan's Bio)

Planning for your own death

  • It's all about those documents!
    • Will, medical directive, POA
    • Beneficiary review and asset titling to reduce probate burden
    • And don't forget about online accounts like Facebook and Gmail – many providers are putting "trusted contact" provisions in place
  • Talk about final plans
    • Burial, cremation, or donation – oh my!
    • Programs to pre-plan and pre-pay your funeral
  • If you haven't hired a financial advisor already, consider doing so

Planning for caregivers

  • Look into what benefits you have through your workplace such as bereavement leave, FMLA, and remote or part-time work arrangements
  • Take a moment to think through the hypotheticals of what you would need to do if a loved one was seriously ill in terms of relocating.
  • Set aside time for the emotional part by considering a therapist, grief support group and/or reading and journaling. Caregiving can be emotionally draining.

Motley Fool Wealth Management, an affiliate of The Motley Fool, is a separate entity, and all financial planning services are provided by financial planners at Fool Wealth. The views expressed are Megan's, and do not necessarily reflect the views of MFWM or any of its affiliates. These comments may not be relied upon as recommendations, investment or financial planning advice.

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